Coin collection – safety

Coins that are collected have a deep history. To preserve that history, coins are needed to be stored properly. Coins are made of metals. Most metals react negatively with the variety of different environmental factors. For instance, copper and silver are the most chemically reactive metals. The numismatist must know to protect the coins from the environmental reactions.

The cause of damage to coins may be many factors including humidity, heat and cold, acids, air pollution, etc. Coins made of silver and copper react chemically when they come in contact with water. Acids may come from a variety of sources.

Safety coin collectionThe most common one is the common paper and cardboard that is used as coin albums or folders. The acids in those storage locations will leach out due time and cause damage to silver and copper coins. Chlorine causes a reaction chemically with the coin that impacts the appearance of the coins. The main source of the chlorine is the flip made from plastics.

The air pollution is not only harmful to the person's health, but also detrimental to the health of the coins that are gathered from various sources. The most common type of damage to coins is improper handling. Touching of a coin directly with the fingers can leave deposits of oils that will damage the surface. The irreparable damage will cause if the coin is dropped on to the hard surface. This may reduce the value of the coins.

The coins must store in a proper coin holder or folder that prevents acid or chlorine deposits. The storage location of the collected coins is as important as to collect the coins. Extreme cold and humid or hot and harsh must be avoided to keep the coin collection in the finest condition. The foremost safest place for storing the coin collection is in a safe deposit box at a bank.